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March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month

Timmins, Ontario - Did you know that colon cancer is the number two cancer killer of men and women, yet it is 90% treatable when caught early? That is a staggering reality! So why aren’t we, as individuals, doing more to catch colon cancer early??? I
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Timmins, Ontario - Did you know that colon cancer is the number two cancer killer of men and women, yet it is 90% treatable when caught early? That is a staggering reality! So why aren’t we, as individuals, doing more to catch colon cancer early???

In Ontario, an estimated 8,700 men and women were diagnosed with colon cancer in 2013 and approximately 3,350 men and women died of the disease last year. Only lung cancer claims more lives.

The Canadian Cancer Society wants you to help us fight colon cancer this March during Colon Cancer Awareness Month by speaking to your doctor about the importance of getting tested every two years, once you turn 50. Getting tested for colon cancer, also known as colon cancer screening, means checking for colon cancer before you have symptoms. Getting checked can find colon cancer early or even prevent it from happening in the first place. It could be as simple as doing a test in the privacy of your own home. Get the bottom line about colon cancer screening, visit stickittocoloncancer.ca.

Here are some questions to ask your doctor about colon cancer screening:

1. What’s my risk for getting colon cancer? 2. What tests should I have to find cancer early and when should I have them? 3. How often should I bet tested? 4. How is the test done? 5. Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test? 6. Who will explain the test results? 7. What happens if the results are not normal?

Things to report to your doctor:

Even if you’re getting checked for colon cancer regularly, you shouldn’t ignore any changes to your body. The following symptoms may be caused by colon cancer or by other less serious health problems. See your doctor if you have:

  • a change in bowel habits
  • blood (either bright red or very dark) in the stool
  • diarrhea, constipation or feeling that the bowel does not empty completely
  • stools that are narrower than usual
  • general abdominal discomfort (frequent gas pains, bloating, fullness or cramps)
  • unexplained weight loss
  • feeling very tired
  • vomiting

The Canadian Cancer Society cares about men and women living with colon cancer and their families. Our information and support services have been proven to decrease anxiety and increase people’s ability to cope with cancer. If you know someone who is living with colon cancer, either as a patient or caregiver be sure to tell them about our free information and support services. When you want to know more about cancer, visit our website www.cancer.ca or call our toll-free, bilingual Cancer Information Service at 1 888 939-3333.

Any businesses, organizations, services clubs, groups or interested individuals are invited to contact the Canadian Cancer Society Timmins Community Office at 705-264-7434 to request a Fight Back presentation to learn more about cancer screening, available services, progress being made, and volunteer opportunities.




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